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I never can resist a pun – last year I paid $91 for a t-shirt because it had a vegetable pun on it. Yup, I am a sucker for a pun. But the title here, play on words though it may be, is no joke. These tarts, galettes, or whatever you want to call them, are savory and so good. I can only take a little credit, since they borrow heavily from other sources, and I encourage you to riff still further on their basic elements.

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The starting point was this post on My Name is Yeh (congrats on the new book, by the way!). That everything bagel topping, I started dreaming about putting it on, well, everything. Except, apparently, pie crust. I envisioned a crust that was somewhere between a thin-crust pizza and a cracker, so I turned to a standby recipe that I’ve used plenty of times in the past, this whole wheat yeasted olive oil pastry from the NY Times. To make a more substantial dinner, I filled it with sauteed spinach, FINALLY delicious heirloom tomatoes, and a liberal sprinkling of Gruyere. There’s something really amazing about the garlic-onion-sesame that’s just bang-on with the slight funk of the cheese, and I couldn’t be more proud of these tarts if I’d thought of them myself!

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Spinach galettes with tomatoes and everything
Serves 4
Spinach, tomatoes and rich Gruyere in a crisp crust that brings to mind your favorite bagel.
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Prep Time
1 hr 30 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
2 hr
Prep Time
1 hr 30 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
2 hr
For the dough
  1. 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  2. ¼ teaspoon sugar
  3. 1 large egg
  4. ¼ cup olive oil
  5. 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  6. 1 cup all-purpose flour
  7. ¾ teaspoon salt
For the filling
  1. 1 medium onion, sliced thin
  2. 1 Tbs olive oil
  3. 12 ounces baby spinach
  4. 4 medium tomatoes
  5. 4 ounces grated Gruyere cheese, about ¾ cup
  6. 1 egg, beaten
For the topping
  1. 2 tsp dried minced garlic
  2. 2 tsp dried minced onion
  3. 1 Tbs poppy seeds
  4. 1 Tbs sesame seeds
  5. ¼ tsp table salt
Instructions
  1. Make the dough, about an hour and half before you want to eat.
  2. Stir together the dry ingredients. Stir in the oil and egg, plus about half a cup of warm water. Using the dough hook of a stand mixer or your hands, knead the dough until it comes together in a smooth ball. It's not necessary to work it too long. Place dough in a clean, oiled bowl, cover with plastic and leave to rise until doubled, about an hour.
  3. While the dough rises, heat the tablespoon of oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the onions and saute until they begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Add the spinach, a handful at a time, letting it cook down and release its liquid.
  4. Slice the tomatoes (tip: slice from the bottom of the tomato for slices that hold together the best) and place the slices on a couple of paper towels to absorb some of their liquid.
  5. Mix together all the topping ingredients in a small bowl.
  6. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
  7. When dough has doubled in bulk, divide it in half; re-cover the half you're not working with while you form the first galette.
  8. Roll out the dough into a circle about 10 inches across. It should be quite thin, about an eighth of an inch.
  9. Place the dough circle on a piece of parchment paper. Brush the surface of the dough with the beaten egg to help keep the bottom from getting soggy.
  10. Place half the spinach in a thin layer over the dough, leaving a generous inch uncovered at the edge. Lay slices of tomato on top of the spinach, and then sprinkle with half the cheese.
  11. Fold the edges of the dough over the toppings, making the prettiest folds you can. Brush the crust with egg wash, and sprinkle the topping mixture generously over the dough.
  12. Repeat the whole process with the second half of the dough.
  13. Carefully slide the galettes on their paper onto a large baking sheet.
  14. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until crust is golden brown and the cheese is beginning to crisp on top.
  15. Let rest for 5 minutes on a cooling rack before slicing.
Adapted from Molly Yeh & Martha Rose Shulman
Adapted from Molly Yeh & Martha Rose Shulman
Emperors Crumbs https://www.emperorscrumbs.com/

My kids love dumplings. Every time I make soup it is expected that I will make dumplings. For me it is a random thing, experimenting with different proportions, different flours, an add this, add that kind of thing. They always turn out different, but they are always a success.
I think my personal favorite is when they are made with semolina flour and when I incorporate cooked vegetables. What kind of vegetables? It depends on what kind of soup I am making.
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This time I was making my favorite Summer Pea Soup, so the candidates were cooked carrots, parsnips, celery root and peas. If you are making a different style soup, you can put your favorite things into them. Make sure you let us know how it turns out!

Vegetable Semolina Dumplings
Serves 4
Semolina Dumplings full of vegetables. Ideal for soups. Kids love them.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
20 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 cups cooked vegetables
  2. 1 cup semolina
  3. 2 eggs
  4. 1/2 tsp salt
  5. pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Put a large pot of water on to boil
  2. In a medium bowl, mash the cooked vegetables.
  3. Add semolina, eggs, salt and pepper.
  4. Stir until a thick batter forms.
  5. With a soup spoon, form tablespoon-sized dumplings and drop them carefully into the boiling water.
  6. Boil the dumplings until they bob to the surface, approximately 5 minutes.
  7. Add them into a soup or enjoy by themselves.
Emperors Crumbs https://www.emperorscrumbs.com/

Sloppy Joes were for me were always one of the most unappetizing things that American cuisine can offer.  Just look at them. Mushy cooked beef with store bought condiments. You plop them over cheap, additive-enriched bread, which will be with the human race long after we are gone. How could you even consider eating it? Right?

There is always a first time. The moments that change your perspective on the world and things evolving around it. There is the first taste of cake when you realize this world is not that bad (well, except the parents who limit it 😉 ), a kiss where you realize you want more, there is the first moment when you realize it is time to try something scary. (more…)


At my office in Hungary, you couldn’t have a meeting without pogácsa. Pogi, as they are affectionately known, are sort of the bagels of Budapest; if you organized a coffee break, you’d better provide pogácsa!

There are about as many different ways of making pogi as there are bakeries, and everyone has an opinion about where to find the very best. Some are rich and flaky, more like an American biscuit, while others are more solid, rather like a scone. They come in different sizes, too, from just an inch or so across to as big as a fist. You can get pogácsa made with cheese, with potato, with pumpkin seeds, with little bits of pork crackling, or any combination of all of that. Naturally, our favorite Budapest czukraszda, Daubner, makes some of the most tender, delicate and delicious pogácsa – they’re worth waiting in the long lines to get some hot from the oven.

Unlike some other bakery specialties, like Dobos Tort or Sacher Torte, though, you can make pogi at home easily and successfully. Valerian’s mother makes a version that is as much potato as flour, and every family seems to have its own treasured recipe. The ones we’re making here are both flaky and fluffy, studded with seeds and tangy with chèvre. Maybe you’d like to make some to bring to the office, as a change of pace. We took some to the preschool for Valentine’s Day, so instead of the traditional little rounds, we cut them in heart shapes. Whatever shape yours take, let us know how you like them!

Pogácsa – Hungarian cheese biscuits

This is a yeast dough, so factor in a couple of hours to let it rise. If you prefer, leave the pumpkin seeds whole for a different texture.

Ingredients

Makes about 2 dozen small pogácsa

  • 1⅓ cups flour
  • 1 Tbs instant yeast
  • 2 heaping Tbs salt
  • 4 oz/113 g chèvre (soft goat cheese)
  • 1 cup pumpkin seeds
  • 4 Tbs olive oil or pumpkin seed oil
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • yolk of one egg, for the wash

Method

  • In a dry pan over medium heat, toast the pumpkin seeds until they begin to hiss and pop. When they have cooled a bit, pulse them a few times in a food processor, or roughly chop with a knife.
  • In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, yeast, and chèvre to form a soft dough. Stir in the whole egg, the sour cream, and the the pumpkin seeds. With a wooden spoon or in a stand mixer, knead the dough until it forms a shaggy, somewhat sticky ball.
  • Cover and let rise in a warm place until double, about 2 hours.
  • Preheat the oven to 350° F/190° C.
  • Turn out the dough onto a floured surface. Sprinkling more flour as needed to keep the dough from sticking, roll it out to about ¼”/1 cm thick, then fold it in half, in half again, and one more time. Roll it out again to ¼” thick and repeat the folding twice more.
  • Rolls out the dough to about half an inch thick, and cut out your pogi with a biscuit cutter or even a small glass. Reroll as necessary to use up all the dough. Put the cut shapes on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  • Lightly beat the egg yolk and brush it over the tops of your pogácsa for a nice shine.
  • Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the tops are nicely golden. Place on a wire rack to cool, and enjoy!